College Basketball Content

Home court advantage? Road is better than home for these teams

Over 30 teams have better road record than at the friendly confines of home

The old adage is that there is no place like home, both for Dorothy in The Wizard of Oz, and the home court in basketball. While Dorothy did have her dream come true, that is not the case for more than 30 teams so far this season through games of February 7.

Take Navy, for example. The Midshipmen were 4-6 at home and 9-2 on the road, a winning percentage difference of .418, as shown in the table below. Saint Joseph’s is the only undefeated team on the road this season, sporting a 9-3 home record while being a perfect at 8-0 on opponents’ home courts. Most of the differences are not nearly that substantial, but it is curious why these teams are even slightly better on the road than at home.

Difference in Road and Home Winning Percentages through Games of February 7, 2016

                 Home       Road
Team              W-L   Pct  W-L   Pct  Diff
Navy              4-6  .400  9-2  .818  .418
Saint Joseph's    9-3  .750  8-0 1.000  .250
James Madison     9-5  .643  8-1  .889  .246
Army              4-6  .400  8-5  .615  .215
UC Santa Barbara  2-5  .286  6-6  .500  .214
Hartford          2-10 .167  4-7  .364  .197
Utah Valley       2-6  .250  5-7  .417  .167
Bowling Green     4-5  .444  6-4  .600  .156
Providence       10-4  .714  6-1  .857  .143
Southern Ill.     9-4  .692  8-2  .800  .108
San Diego St.     9-3  .750  6-1  .857  .107
Gonzaga           9-3  .750  6-1  .857  .107
Northeastern      4-7  .364  5-6  .455  .091
Bucknell          5-5  .500  7-5  .583  .083
Idaho             4-4  .500  7-5  .583  .083
American          2-6  .250  5-10 .333  .083
Charlotte         4-7  .364  4-5  .444  .081
Troy              2-7  .222  3-7  .300  .078
Southern Utah     1-8  .111  2-9  .182  .071
Stetson           1-5  .167  3-10 .231  .064
Youngstown St.    2-6  .250  4-9  .308  .058
Lipscomb          2-7  .222  3-8  .273  .051
USC Upstate       2-8  .200  3-9  .250  .050
Elon              6-6  .500  6-5  .545  .045
SE Missouri       1-8  .111  2-11 .154  .043
Omaha             4-4  .500  7-6  .538  .038
Milwaukee         4-3  .571  6-4  .600  .029
Charleston So.    2-7  .222  3-9  .250  .028
Oakland           6-3  .667  9-4  .692  .026
South Florida     3-12 .200  2-7  .222  .022
Denver            7-6  .538  5-4  .556  .017
VCU              11-2  .846  6-1  .857  .011
UC Riverside      5-6  .455  6-7  .462  .007

Bracket Bits from The RPI Report and The Women's RPI Report

Tidbits from recent issues of The RPI Report and The Women's RPI Report

From The RPI Report:  Nineteen (19) conferences have averaged from 1 to 1.5 NCAA teams per year over the last 19 seasons. While 13 of those 19 conferences have had only their lone automatic qualifier in the tournament over that time span, the other 6 have placed 2 teams in the NCAA tournament at least once, and 2 of those have placed 3 teams in the tournament once. The Horizon had 3 teams in 1998 and had 2 teams in 2003, 2007, and 2009; and the Colonial had 3 teams in 2011 and 2 teams in 2006 and 2007. The Mid-American had 2 teams in both the 1998 and 1999 tournaments, the Sun Belt had 2 teams in the 2008 and 2013 tournaments, while the Big West had 2 teams in 2005 and the Metro Atlantic 2 teams in the Big Dance in 2012.

From The Women's RPI Report:  There are 3 divisions amongst  the conferences when it comes to how many teams each conference sends to the NCAA tournament each season. Over the last 19 seasons, the top group of 6 conferences has averaged from 6.5 to 3.8 teams per season, and the next group of 4 conferences has averaged from 2.5 to 2.1 NCAA tournament teams since 1997. Regarding the last group of 22 conferences, 13 of those have sent only their automatic qualifier to the Big Dance, and the other 9 have averaged getting from 1.1 to 1.5 teams into the tournament on a yearly basis. However, over the past 5 seasons, 5 conferences of that 9-conference group did not get a second team into the NCAA tournament, and 2 got a second team in just once. Also, 2 conferences in the group of 4 averaging 2.1 to 2.5 teams per season placed just 1 team in the tournament each of the past 4 seasons.

Teams with No. 1 schedule strength rankings can usually look forward to NCAA tournament invitation

Kansas had No. 1 overall schedule strength rank at end of regular season and went 1-1 in NCAA tournament

Kansas won honors for the second consecutive season for the best overall schedule strength at the end of the 2015 regular season. In addition, KU also had the No. 2 regular season non-conference schedule strength for 2015. The Jayhawks also had the best opponents' won-lost record of 689-401 (.6321) in the regular season, and the best RPI rank of opponents played, which is an alternate way of determining schedule strength. Kansas received a No. 2 seed and lost to Wichita State in the third round of the NCAA tournament by a score of 78-65. Since 1991, 20 of the 25 teams holding the No. 1 schedule strength rank at the end of the regular season were in the NCAA tournament, and 21 of those 25 teams were in post-season play. However, having the No. 1 schedule strength does not guarantee success in the NCAA tournament. In six of the last fifteen seasons, the team holding top schedule strength honors has lost in the first round (using pre-2011 terminology) of the NCAA tournament. In the ten years prior to that, no teams with the No. 1 schedule strength that made the NCAA tournament lost in the first round, although three of those teams did not make the NCAA tournament. The best that a team has done in the NCAA tournament that had the best regular-season schedule strength was North Carolina in 1997, losing in the national semifinals to eventual national champion Arizona. Notre Dame had the best regular-season schedule strength in 1992 with a 14-14 record and finished second in the NIT. List

Several conferences use CBN's RPI data to break tournament seeding ties

Administrators have complete confidence in CBN's RPI

Nearly all conference offices subscribe to both The RPI Report and The Women's RPI Report because they know they can count on the most accurate weighted RPI for the men and the women anywhere this side of the NCAA tournament selection committees. CBN first made the Adjusted RPI ratings (which are no longer used for either the men nor the women) available to The RPI Report and The Women's RPI Report subscribers during the 1998-99 season. The NCAA used the Adjusted RPI ratings from the 1993-94 through the 2003-04 season for the men and have used the weighted RPI since the 2004-05 season, while the women used the Adjusted RPI through the 2010-11 season and began using the weighted RPI during the 2011-12 season. The weighted RPI gives more credit to teams that schedule tough opponents and that beat good teams at home and on the road. Story

AP carried the Men's RPI Ratings for 16th consecutive year during the 2009-10 season

2009-10 was the 13th season that AP distributed the Women's RPI Ratings

During the 2009-10 season, the Associated Press (AP) carried the CBN's RPI for both men's and women's college basketball, for the 16th consecutive year, for at least part of the season. In addition, 2009-10 was the 13th consecutive season that the AP distributed the women's RPI for at least part of the season. Story